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Almanac of American Employers

Major Employers Market Research




Almanac of American Employers:

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  • Industry Trends Analysis
  • Technologies Analysis
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  • Business Leaders and Corporate Executives
  • Industry Associations Database
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U.S. Job Market Overview

Job seekers in 2014 will continue to face a difficult job market, although a higher level of hiring may be seen if the economy is stable and confidence in both consumer and business areas increase. Many types of employers have restructured and downsized thanks to the deep financial crisis of 2007-09. By 2011, most employers had pushed productivity about as far as they could, to the point that significant future growth in business will require a larger number of new employees.  Some of the business sectors that were hardest hit had begun to stabilize by 2012. For example, automobile sales are significantly higher than they were during the recent recession, banks are more stable and the home building business was enjoying terrific growth through late 2013.
However, as 2013 was ending, the global economy was dealing with a very difficult financial and business environment in Europe, a slowdown in global trade and slowing economies in important emerging nations such as Brazil, India and China. These problems will have an effect on employment in the U.S. over the next several months.
On the positive side, as of late 2013, stock markets had reached impressive highs, house values had bounced back in most American cities and consumers had shed considerable amounts of debt. These conditions bode well for business and employment growth at some point in the future.
Meanwhile, job seekers who want good positions must be extremely well prepared. A large part of the preparation requires that they do meaningful research into prospective employers and the industries in which they operate. The fact remains that there are millions of Americans either out of work or underemployed. Competition for job openings will remain fierce. Many companies receive hundreds or even thousands of resumes for every job opening. Simply sending in a resume and hoping for the best is not enough for a successful job search.
America’s unemployment level will remain disturbingly high throughout 2014. The good news is that a select set of employers and growth companies will offer good job opportunities. In this period of challenges, a few companies will enjoy booming business. Sectors such as cloud computing and health care will continue to grow and hire. A few companies with exciting new technologies or cost-saving services will see terrific growth. Salesforce.com, a highly innovative provider of online business services, has been a good example.
Solid companies that do a terrific job of providing the day-to-day needs of consumers and business will continue to hire—Costco, Amazon.com and Southwest Airlines are good examples. Other industry sectors that fall into this category include insurance firms such as USAA and GEICO, along with electric and gas utilities.
Oil and gas exploration and production will continue to be a bright spot for hiring, even if oil prices decline somewhat. Oil field services firm Halliburton has been hiring thousands of people, largely to work in America’s rapidly expanding shale oil and gas fields. The development of vast new shale oil and shale gas areas in dozens of states is opening up excellent job opportunities, fueling growth at providers of related services and supplies, and encouraging business investment of many kinds. At the same time, this new supply of oil and gas is holding down market prices, providing relief to consumers’ budgets.
Growing numbers of consumers will prefer to buy from firms that sell goods and services online, offering savings of time, money and car travel. This boosts companies like Amazon.com that offer low prices combined with deep selections and great customer service. Virtually all major retailers, including giants like Wal-Mart and Home Depot, are working hard to provide better online services and choices to their customers.
The travel industry has stabilized to a large degree. Airlines are in better financial shape than they were in the recent past. Many have shed debt through bankruptcy and successfully reorganized as more financially stable companies. Hotels are enjoying high occupancy rates. Meanwhile, travel has become the single most successful sector at selling products and services via the Internet.
The automobile sector is booming. New cars have been selling very well in recent months, and hiring has been strong at car dealers and manufacturers alike.
Banking companies will continue to be challenged. Some will have lay offs.
Americans who find themselves in the market for a job will need to understand the changes surging through the economy in order to determine which companies to pursue and which to avoid. The U.S. employment market has evolved dramatically, and job seekers must be both knowledgeable and nimble in order to position themselves to find promising careers.
In order to create a robust job market, corporate investment, profits, productivity and revenues must align themselves correctly. These economic indicators were positive during the 2003 to mid-2007 period, and millions of new American jobs were created. As 2007 was winding down, the residential real estate crash, high levels of consumer debt and difficult credit markets were combining to restrain the economy. Vast numbers of workers were laid off across virtually all types of industries, and hiring slowed to a trickle.  One of the results of this tough recession was a new emphasis on increased productivity and cost-effectiveness at employers of most types.
During 2014, executives will be under the usual pressure to maintain profitability. If the economy sees significant growth, managers will be encouraged to increase hiring. Meanwhile, many major corporations are sitting on huge piles of cash. When CEOs become more confident about the future, that cash could fuel job-creating investments. The bottom line:  new grads will find it difficult to land their dream jobs, and job seekers of many types will continue to be challenged to find appropriate positions. Nonetheless, there will still be job opportunities for those who are diligent in seeking good employers in almost all business sectors.
 
Economic Factors Affecting the Job Market
        Business Productivity: Productivity has been rising in recent years. That is, business can be produced—whether it is goods or services—by utilizing fewer workers than before. This will be extremely beneficial to the U.S. economy in the long run, but it can hurt the job market over the short term. Productivity is boosted by new technologies, improved management methods and other factors, sometimes as simple as reorganizing the staff and redesigning the workflow to increase output. It can also receive a quick boost from restrained corporate hiring.  If rising productivity occurs along with rapidly rising sales and profits, then the job market will improve.
        Corporate SalesA trend of rising sales encourages hiring. Reasonable sales growth in 2014 could lead to increased hiring. It remains to be seen whether this will occur.
        Corporate Profits: When profits increase sharply, companies are inclined to increase both business investment and hiring. Corporate profits were strong during 2010-13. However, there is still a high level of uncertainty about America's economic future. Much of recent corporate profitability was the result of restrained spending and hiring. Hiring will rebound when corporate sales, and accompanying profits, show significant growth, encouraging executives to forecast an extended period of increased demand for their products and services.
 
In order to compete effectively in today’s job market, one of the most important things you can do is arm yourself with knowledge. It is vital for the job seeker to use the best reference tools possible in order to seek out employers that offer a reasonable balance of financial stability, opportunities for advancement and good pay. Excellent job opportunities always exist if you know where to look. Many of America’s most successful firms currently need large numbers of new employees.
Thousands of companies, in technical and non-technical sectors, will need large numbers of new hires. In particular, companies that offer products or services that save time and/or money will prosper—for example, many types of companies that offer services that help businesses operate more efficiently, will be hiring. Meanwhile, large companies that are not increasing their overall numbers of employees will be hiring on a regular basis due to normal attrition—that is, the loss of employees due to retirement, relocation or other personal circumstances. For example, massive companies like Walgreen’s or Kroger typically need to hire tens of thousands of workers yearly due to normal attrition.

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Complete list of market research data provided by Plunkett Research, Ltd. for the Major Employers
  • Cost Control Remains a Concern at Employers/Consolidation Through Mergers Continues
  • Unemployment Will Remain High, But Opportunities Are Available to Diligent Job Seekers
  • Consumers Spend Less, Save More, Affecting a Wide Variety of Companies
  • Technology Continues to Create Sweeping Changes in the Workplace
  • Continued Growth in Outsourcing, Including Supply Chain and Logistics Services
  • Millions Working as Temps
  • Offshoring, Reshoring and the Rebound in American Manufacturing
  • Older Americans Will Delay Retirement and Work Longer/Many Employers Find Older Employees Desirable
  • Employment Sectors that Will Offer an Above-Average Number of Job Opportunities in 2014
  • Complete list of statistics data provided by Plunkett Research, Ltd. for the Major Employers
  • U.S. Employment Overview: 2013-2014

  • U.S. Civilian Labor Force: 1997-February 2014
  • Number of People Employed & Unemployed, U.S.: February 2013 vs. February 2014
  • Unemployed Jobseekers by Sex, Reason for Unemployment & Active Job Search Methods Used: 2013 Average
  • U.S. Labor Force Ages 16 to 24 Years Old by School Enrollment, Educational Attainment, Sex, Race & Ethnicity: October 2012
  • Educational Attainment & Median Annual Earnings, U.S. Population 18 & Older: 2012
  • Work Status & Median Annual Earnings by Detailed Field of Bachelor Degree: 2011
  • Median Annual Earnings by Field of Bachelor’s Degree by Class of Worker & Educational Attainment: 2011
  • Medical Care Benefits in the U.S.: Access, Participation and Take-Up Rates, March 2013
  • Employers' Costs for Health Insurance, Amount and Percent of Total Compensation, U.S.: Selected Years 2005-2013
  • Retirement Benefits in the U.S.: Access, Participation and Take-Up Rates, March 2013
  • Employment by Major Industry Sector: 2002, 2012 & Projected 2022
  • Top 30 U.S. Occupations by Numerical Change in Job Growth: 2012-2022
  • Top 30 U.S. Occupations by Percent Change in Job Growth: 2012-2022
  • Occupations with the Largest Expected Employment Increases, U.S.: 2012-2022
  • Occupations with the Largest Expected Employment Declines, U.S.: 2012-2022
  • Table of Contents for Plunkett's Major Employers Almanac  
    See Full Table of Contents

    introduction 1
    how to use this book 3
    chapter 1: major trends affecting job seekers 7
    1) u.s. job market overview 7
    Profiles of Leading Major Employers Companies are provided, including Public, Private, U.S., and non-U.S. Firms.  
    See Full List of Companies

    • 1-800-Flowers.Com Inc
    • 24 Hour Fitness
    • 3M Company
    • 7-Eleven Inc
    • 84 Lumber Company
    • 99 Cents Only Stores
    • A C Moore Arts & Crafts Inc
    • Aaron's Inc
    • Abbott Laboratories
    • Abercrombie & Fitch Co
  • Abercrombie & Fitch Co
  • ABF Freight System Inc
  • ABM Industries Inc
  • Academy Sports & Outdoors Ltd
  • Accenture LLP
  • Accenture plc
  • Acosta Inc
  • Actavis plc
  • Activision Blizzard Inc
  • Acxiom Corp
  • Key Major Employers Topics
  • Complete Companies List Data
  • Market Research
  • Business Analysis
  • Competitive Intelligence
  • Computer Hardware, Software
  • Health Care
  • Manufacturing
  • Distributing
  • Broadcasting
  • Real Estate, Construction
  • Biotech
  • Energy
  • Financial Services, Asset Management, Insurance
  • Electronics Manufacturing
  • Banking, Retailing, Consulting, Logistics and Transportation Firms
  • Executive Mailing Lists